#newsflash articles to help you with your English vocabulary

Learning English is so popular right now! We hope you find the English learning hints & tips section on our blog helpful – it’s packed with advice, guidance and quizzes to help you on your learning journey. There are lots of resources out there that...

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Learning English is so popular right now! We hope you find the English learning hints & tips section on our blog helpful – it’s packed with advice, guidance and quizzes to help you on your learning journey. There are lots of resources out there that will be useful and help you with your English vocabulary – including other popular articles on the internet. Here are just a few #newsflash articles to help you…

“Boil down” and “boil over” – English phrases explained

We love exploring English phrases – especially the stranger ones! What do they mean? And where do they come from? We found this great article and video about English phrases from Australia Plus, a TV station that encourages and helps people to learn English. It’s really useful because it explains how some phrases can sound the same – but mean completely different things.

20 words that once meant something very different

We know that learning a new language can be challenging – especially when it’s natural that languages continue to evolve over time. This has been looked at by TED Talks, the non-profit organisation that posts blogs and videos about interesting topics. In this article, language historian Anne Curzan acknowledges that the meanings of some words change over time – in ways that might surprise you. She also provides examples of English words you may not have realised didn’t always mean what they do today.

63 differences between US and British English revealed

English is a widely spoken language, and there are slightly different versions throughout the globe. That means that even native speakers of the language can be confused by certain words. For example, in the US, they say “eraser” to talk about the useful little block used to rub out pencil markings. But in the UK, it’s known as a “rubber”. There’s certainly no right or wrong way to define the perfect version of the English language – and we love the fact that there are varying versions of words and phrases throughout the world. This article, on the Daily Mail’s website, MailOnline, takes a closer look at some of the differences between American and British English. The handy illustrations will help you to understand the meaning of the words.

When two negatives don’t make a positive

This article on The Chronicle of Higher Education website takes a closer look at speaking English – and specifically clarifies the “double negative”. Writer Geoff Pullum is a professor of linguistics at the University of Edinburgh, and here he explains how saying “I don’t know nothing about computers” actually means the opposite of what the speaker is trying to communicate. Instead of saying he doesn’t know anything about computers, he actually says he doesn’t know nothing – so he knows something! If you’re interested in reading articles like this that take a deeper look into the English language, have a click around the site to read more.

QUIZ: Can you spell the most “unspellable” words in English?

We love a quiz – but we must warn you that you might find this one posted on the Playbuzz website a bit tricky! It tests how well you can spell certain English words – we can’t tell you which ones as we could give away the answers! But try it now to see how your English vocabulary and writing skills are coming along…

Each week, we highlight some of the best articles and videos about English language learning and teaching on our Twitter feed. Follow Pearson English now and we’ll help you make progress in English.

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