What our Monday Motivations posts can teach you about learning English

We all need some wise words to give us a little boost at the start of a new week, which is why we continue to bring you our Motivational Monday posts; a collection of quotes and ideas to provide inspiration for whatever goals we have...

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We all need some wise words to give us a little boost at the start of a new week, which is why we continue to bring you our Motivational Monday posts; a collection of quotes and ideas to provide inspiration for whatever goals we have ahead, as well as how they might apply to teaching and learning English.

Which ones(s) from those below appeal to you, and why? Let us know via Facebook and Twitter.

Learning another language...

1. “Learning another language is not only learning different words for the same things, but learning another way to think about things” – Flora Lewis

The lesson: It’s important to think of English language learning as more than a literal translating of words and phrases. It’s about understanding and being understood, and about broadening your horizons via widening your methods of communication.

The art of teaching...

2. “The art of teaching is the art of assisting discovery” – Mark Van Doren

The lesson: Teaching is about opening the minds of others, but can also teach you a lot about yourself – as these first-hand accounts for people who have taught in Turkey, Sri Lanka, Mexico, Spain, Brazil and Nepal, illustrate.

You cannot open a book without learning something

3. “You cannot open a book without learning something” – Confucius

The lesson: Even if opening a course text highlights how little you know about a subject that you thought you were competent in, that is helpful.

I like to listen...

4. “I like to listen. I have learned a great deal from listening carefully. Most people never listen” – Ernest Hemingway

The lesson: When learning any language, listening is vital. A natural part of learning is spending time in the native country of the language you’re learning, practicing your spoken and written language, but also listening to what people are saying to you, and how they say it.

There are no shortcuts to a place worth going...

5. “There are no short cuts to any place worth going” – Beverly Stills

The lesson: As this thought-leadership article from Mike Mayor explains, improving your proficiency in the four skills in a new language – listening, reading, speaking and writing – can be difficult and time-consuming. In other words, there are no shortcuts to proficiency; we must map out a personalised path to it.

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