How to bring Shakespeare to life in the classroom

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Shakespeare three classroom activities pearson english readers

Monday 23rd April marks the birth (and death) of William Shakespeare: poet, playwright and pre-eminent dramatist. His poems and plays have been translated into 80 languages, even Esperanto and Klingon.

It is remarkable how Shakespeare’s iconic body of work has withstood the test of time. More than four centuries on, his reflections on the human condition have lost none of their relevance. Contemporary artists and writers continue to draw on his language, imagery and drama for inspiration.

But, despite the breadth and longevity of his appeal, getting students excited about Shakespeare is not always straightforward. The language is challenging, the characters may be unfamiliar and the plots can seem far removed from modern life.

However, with the right methods and resources, there is plenty for teenagers and young adults to engage with. After all, love, desperation, jealousy and anger are feelings that we can all relate to, regardless of the age group, culture or century we belong to!

So, how can you bring classic Shakespearean dramas like Hamlet, Othello and Macbeth to life? There are many ways for your learners to connect with Shakespeare and get excited by his works. Here we’ll show you three classroom activities to do with your students and some indispensable resources to ensure that reading Shakespeare is as accessible and enjoyable as possible!

3 ideas to shake up Shakespeare

1. The Bard’s epic burns

The very word ‘Shakespeare’ is enough to strike dread into the hearts of some youngsters. That’s why it’s so important to highlight the lighter, more humorous side of his work from the very beginning. This activity, based on some of Shakespeare’s finest insults, will help transmit a crucial idea: these plays were designed to entertain.

The Bard was renowned for his linguistic creativity and nowhere is this more evident than in his sumptuous put-downs. Some of them still sound as hard-hitting as they would have done back then. Take these for example:

“Thou crusty batch of nature!” (Troilus and Cressida)

“Go, prick thy face, and over-red thy fear, thou lily-liver’d boy.” (Macbeth)

“I do wish thou were a dog, that I might love thee something.” (Timon of Athens)

Once your students have tried out some Shakespearean slurs and enjoyed some gentle verbal sparring, you can draw their attention to some important grammatical differences.

For example, in Early Modern English, the language of Shakespeare, there were various ways of saying ‘you’. As the subject of a sentence, it would be ‘thou’ (e.g. I do wish thou were a dog). As the object of a sentence, they would say ‘thee’ (e.g. …I might love thee something).

We certainly don’t want to encourage name-calling among students, but if conducted carefully, it’s a great way to give them a feel for the jocular power of Shakespeare’s language.

If that’s not enough, you can let them loose to compile their very own Shakespearean burns with this English to Shakespearean translator and table of insults.

2. Use film adaptations

Not only has Shakespeare inspired scores of artist and writers, but many of his plays have also been adapted to film. Showing students a cinematic version of one of Shakespeare’s best works is a surefire way of creating interest and promoting an appreciation of the plot. It is not a substitute for a more in-depth analysis of the text, but can be an effective complementary activity.

Video and audio are simply more familiar formats for many young people. Here are some more recent adaptations that you might consider showing in class:

  • Hamlet (1996) – This is Kenneth Branagh’s excellent remake of the tragedy about justice and revenge.
  • Romeo and Juliet (1996) – Shakespeare’s classic, starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes, is recreated in the the hip modern suburb of Verona.
  • Much Ado About Nothing (2012) – Directed by Joss Whedon, this is a modern retelling of Shakespeare’s classic comedy about two pairs of lovers with different takes on romance.
  • Macbeth (2015) – Justin Kurzel’s take on Shakespeare’s tragedy about power, ambition, deceit, and murder.

3. Practice the sounds of Shakespearean English

Another great way to engage your students is to get them performing! It’s easy to forget that most playgoers in Shakespeare’s time would have been illiterate. His words were written not to be read, but to be performed and watched.

To begin with, you can present your students with a selection of phrases first coined by Shakespeare or, at least, recorded for the first time in his works. They can put on their actors’ hats and make short sentences with these phrases, pretending they’re on stage at Shakespeare’s famous Globe Theatre.

As their theatrical confidence grows, you can move onto longer texts. Shakespearean dialogues offer a great opportunity for pair work. They can spend some time practising their lines in pairs, before performing in front of the class.

Here are a couple of scenes that lend themselves well to this type of activity:

  • Romeo and Juliet, Act 2 Scene 2
  • Othello, Act 3 Scene 4

Literary resources for your classroom

 
 

Engaging and effective classroom activities depend on having quality resources. When it comes to using Shakespeare’s work with learners of English, accessibility is everything.

So, instead of diving into the original text, your students can experience Shakespeare’s iconic plays as Pearson English Readers and Pearson English Active Readers. These are abridged versions of Shakespeare’s finest tragedies and comedies, with carefully-graded language that stays true to Shakespeare’s unique style. By reading, listening to and performing these plays, students can develop their language and communication skills.

Hamlet, King Lear, Othello, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, The Merchant of Venice, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Three Great Plays of Shakespeare are all available at various levels. Whereas Stories from Shakespeare and Tales from Shakespeare and More Tales from Shakespeare present similar dramas but as tales. Finally, for a fascinating account of his life and works there’s Shakespeare: His Life and Plays. All of our readers include an MP3 pack, teacher’s resources, vocabulary lists and engaging activities for students.

For more information about all of Pearson English Graded Readers, visit the catalogue and discover over 450 titles to suit all tastes, ages and abilities.

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